This and That

I’m starting to get my mojo back.  It’s slow, but the ability to write more than 140 characters (damn you Twitter!) is slowly coming back.  Lots of stuff churning, fermenting and running around in my brain.  Just not completely ready yet.

But…

This whole Facebook placenta explusion drama deserves a comment.

Was it a HIPAA violation?  No.  Did it in any way endanger a patient?  No.  Was it in poor taste?  Yeah, it probably was.  I believe that the school in question over-reacted and by doing so created the social media furor that has ensued.  Give a small issue large exposure and the chances of it going away quietly is pretty slim (see Sarah  Palin…).

How this reflects poorly on the nursing profession is beyond me.  All I saw in the picture – the grainy B&W picture, was a young female in scrubs showcasing an unidentifiable thing.  If no one had mentioned it was a placenta, I never would have guessed.  Did you see the excitement in her eyes?  Could you feel the zest for learning that exuded from the picture?  It was almost palpable.  Sad that the school saw this a gross violation of, well, everything and decided the 4 students involved had to pay.  As the old saying goes, “Heads will roll!”

All we have ended up teaching these students is that nursing is reactive, vindictive, punitive and slow to change.  It’s not like they were using the placenta as a marionette, or some twisted nursing school version of “Weekend at Bernie’s”.  It was a mistake on the part of the students, but not one as grievous as the administrators would lead you to believe.

Here’s what they should have done…  Quietly ask the student to remove the post, explaining that it reflects poorly on the school – with a reason why it does so.  Give a small reprimand, make the students take a media ethics course or what-not and take the time as administrators to formulate a comprehensive social media policy that is easy to understand and adhere to.  Done, no muss, no fuss.  A simple explanation of why and a punishment that fits the “crime” would have caused far less of a brouhaha than the route they took.

But that’s just my take on it.

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2 Comments

  1. Yeah, most of us ‘nurse bloggers’ who have read anything about this are still befuddled by their actions?
    I’m hoping that the outcry may influence some sort of change in their decision (yeah.. I know I’m reaching here).
    Just sad and angering.

    Reply

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